PAV
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The Kiss | Piece (Peace) for women and pollinating insects | We all cry the same way 

3 video works and an audio intro

in PAV_platforma de arte vizuale initiated & produced Dan Perjovschi in the frame of Documenta 15

technical support: Hans Scherer

curator: Iris Ordean

Sibiu, 2022

An ecofeminist reminder of love and respect for the finesse and fragility of life, in a world more and more affected by violence and avoidable sufferance.

 

The Kiss

They remained fused to each other for more than 5 hours, in the sun, in the rain, inseparable, ecstatic and indifferent to all that was happening around. Bodies of love in a choreography of an extreme tenderness. Absolute masters of kiss. Nature was showing again as a huge space of performing arts or an art gallery in which uncountable and refined non-human artworks are happening all the time. This reinterpretation of the theme of the kiss with a snails couple, questions again all the narratives about human superiority in terms of performing love and respecting the finesse of the world.

 

Piece (Peace) for women and pollinating insects

There are incredibly talented performers around us which, unsurprisingly, are not human beings. Like this Chrysoperla Carnea harmonizing perfectly with Joan La Barbara sounds during a delicately hypnotic dance that plants the viewer in a soothing, strange loop.  In a world so endangered by the mechanics of destruction and war, Piece for women and pollinating insects offer the taste of the fragile tenderness of a biological, non-mechanical, glimpse of our reality. A glimpse that we might lose.

 

 

We all cry the same way

Some years ago, somewhere on the margins of Europe, I cried for hours. As it was not a cry caused by personal reasons, I decided to record it. The tears where triggered by the fact that we did not learned, neither at a personal, nor at a collective level, to stop making each other suffer in the most unjust, but also avoidable ways. I was deploring the avoidable sufferance, logically pointless, of humanity. Now, some years after, against the background of wars and cries and blood spills from Ukraine, Syria, Somalia, Ethiopia, Myanmar, Mozambique, Palestine  and so many other place of the world, WE ALL CRY THE SAME WAY is an invitation to perform another future by taking a fresh start in a more peaceful course of our actions, as deprived of avoidable sufferance as possible.

ADRIANA CHIRUTA